• Kellyville Ridge Veterinary Hospital
  • 02 9629 2030
  • 27 Merriville Rd, Kellyville Ridge

Vaccination and Microchipping

Vaccination has revolutionised control of infectious disease in our pets. It is essential that all pets are adequately vaccinated to help protect them and the pet population as a whole.

Cats & Kittens
Kittens require 3 vaccinations given 4 weeks apart. Their first vaccination should be given at 6 - 8 weeks of age. 
The immunity from kitten vaccination weakens over time and they can again become susceptible to disease. Adults require annual vaccination to maintain immunity against disease.

The F3 vaccination provides cats with protection against Feline enteritis and Feline respiratory disease. Feline Enteritis is usually fatal and Feline Respiratory Disease can be debilitating and difficult to treat.  If your cat often goes outside it is recommended that they are immunized against Feline AIDS. Cats can also be vaccinated to prevent Feline Leukemia and Chlamydia.

Dogs & Puppies
Puppies require 3 vaccinations given 4 weeks apart. Their first vaccination should be given at 6 - 8 weeks of age. 
The immunity from puppy vaccination weakens over time and they can again become susceptible to disease. Adults require annual vaccination to maintain immunity against disease.


The C5 vaccination provides your dog with protection against 4 major infectious diseases: Parvovirus, Distemper, Hepatitis and Kennel cough, the first three of which are often fatal. Treatment is difficult, expensive & often unsuccessful.

Rabbits
Rabbits should be vaccinated against Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus (previously known as Rabbit Calicivirus) from 4 weeks of age and then every 6 - 12 months to maintain immunity throughout life. Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus is a deadly disease that has been introduced in Australia to help control the wild rabbit population.

 

Microchipping
A microchip is about the size of a grain of rice and is injected under your pet’s skin. It can be done during a normal consultation. The microchip is embedded with a code unique to your pet and is the most effective form of permanent identification. This code is placed onto a national computer database, so it is particularly useful in the return of lost pets. They can also assist where the ownership of an animal is in dispute. In some states of Australia microchipping of pets is now compulsory.

If a pet is ever lost and is handed in at a veterinary clinic or animal shelter a microchip scanner is passed over the animal to reveal the unique code. The vet or animal shelter can then refer to the database to identify the name, address and phone number of the owner, so they can be reunited.

If your pet is not microchipped please give us a call to make an appointment to have one inserted.  If you find a lost pet please call us to arrange a scan; we can reunite microchipped pets with their worried owners.